Financier George Soros Is Not A Trump Supporter And That Won’t Change

It’s no secret. George Soros bet big on Hillary Clinton. Clinton and Soros developed a friendship over the last 20 years, and that friendship brought Soros back to politics as a political donor in 2016. The last time Soros made a large contribution to a presidential election was in 2004. Soros wanted to keep George W. Bush out of the White House.

Hillary Clinton was the candidate that most of the country wanted in the White House, and Soros had enough money available to make Clinton president on Snopes. But Trump proved to be a formidable and shrewd opponent. He beat the political pundits at their own game by using tactics that didn’t conform to the established rules of order. He hit below the belt, and that appealed to millions of people that wanted the political system to take a sucker punch and be knocked out.

George Soros donated more than $14 million to the Democratic candidates, and most of those candidates lost. According to an article published by Politico, Soros immediately went to work, and he is formulating a plan to hold Trump accountable when he takes office in 2017. Soros called a meeting of the Democratic Donor Alliance, and that group met in Washington to develop a plan to checkmate Trump and to reorganize the Democratic Party. High-profile Democrats on nytimes.com and elected officials attended that meeting, and a strategy was discussed. What that strategy is, remains to be seen.

The Wall Street Journal recently reported that George Soros lost more than $1 billion after the election because of his bearish position in the stock market on opensocietyfoundations.org. Soros made some financial moves before the election, and those moves hurt, but the Soros Management Fund still finished 2016 with a 5 percent return. Soros is used to losing and then recouping his losses. That is the nature of his investment business. But George Soros doesn’t like to lose when it comes to human rights and Democratic principles. That’s why he is fighting back after the Trump win.

Soros called Trump a “would-be dictator, and he believes Trump will have a negative impact on the U.S. economy, according to politico.com. A border tax on Mexican imports could have an impact on the world’s economy, according to Soros. In fact, the border tax is just one of the issues that Soros thinks will unravel economic growth.

The loss to Trump is a catalyst for the 86-year-old billionaire. Instead of retreating from the political scene like he did in 2004, George Soros is standing firm, and he is challenging Trump to do the right thing. The right thing is to keep the borders open, acknowledge climate changing threats, and to honor the Democratic system.

Trump is wealthy, but he’s not a wealthy as George Soros. Soros is a formidable foe with worldwide connections and a hefty cash flow. And Soros is not afraid to use that cash to stop Trump from turning the free world into an insane sideshow. The chance that Trump will ask for help from Soros is slim. Both men have different political and social beliefs.

1 thought on “Financier George Soros Is Not A Trump Supporter And That Won’t Change”

  1. It would have been interesting to me if they were both known from a more traditional difference point like Marxist or capitalist. This essay writing service providers can give me a lazy help so that I would not have to go deep reading about the social and political difference. It is still possible the dou can have changes from any one of them though.

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